• on a comment on On The Ground In Puerto Rico over 5 years ago

    My guess is that it is two reasons for less coverage of Puerto Rico than the other states (which I have not seen personally online, as to me there seems more coverage of Puerto Rico in the last two weeks than I have seen in the last two years...):

    1. It is more expensive for news networks to cover anything beyond the 48 continuous states (Alaska, Hawaii, Virgin Islands and Guam all received less coverage than Puerto Rico)
    2. Puerto Rico does not get to vote in November.

  • on a comment on The Meaning of Half over 5 years ago

    For the Clinton campaign and their surrogate trolls who constantly play the "Clinton is more electable"  game, please remember that we have MORE THAN 5 MONTHS until the November election.  

    What did Bill Clinton's race look like in 1992 in June?  Whoa, in a general election matchup poll taken in June 1992, Ross Perot had 39%, followed by George Bush at 31%, and finally Bill Clinton with 25%.  But wait!  The November 1992 election results 5 MONTHS LATER were: Bill Clinton 43%, George Bush 37%, Ross Perot 19%.  A lot can--and will--change between now and November.

    Here's the poll from 1992.  Read it and re-join the reality based community:
    http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.ht ml?res=9E0CE7DB133EF932A25755C0A96495826 0

  • on a comment on A 50-State Campaign? over 5 years ago

    Exactly.  I can't speak for other states, but here in Oregon, the organizing that the Obama campaign has done is about energizing the grassroots volunteers and donations in a way that I have never seen before.  Two days after our May 20th Oregon primary, there was a Democratic Party of Oregon event called "United for Change" where most prominent Democrats in the state gathered to speak about sweeping change in November, from President Obama, to Senator Merkley (to beat our current Republican Gordon Smith), to House races and increasing the Democratic majority in our Oregon State House and Senate.  Winning the Presidency is only half of the strategy of the Obama campaign...changing the Democratic party across this country from the bottom up is another part.  Some of the establishment Dems who have not served the people need to be as worried as the Republicans.  And for the record, I was a registered Independent, but registered Democrat to be able to vote in the primary, and I have never worked on Democratic campaigns in my life before this year.

  • comment on a post Clinton Steps Back over 5 years ago

    I have had so many "final straw" moments with the Clinton Campaign, it would be dishonest for me to say that this was one of them.  But I have long supported the concept that Clinton should stay in the campaign until the last primary vote on June 3rd and then close down her campaign being able to say "we fought to the end".  She has fought hard, and should be respected for that.  But my caveat to her staying in until June 3rd was that she would end the negative attacks on Obama and focus on Democratic party unity.  But sadly, the best interests of the Democratic party do not appear to be what the Clinton campaign is interested in at this point.  You had Ferraro driving a further wedge with female Democrats with her comments about sexism last week, and you had AFSCME's McEntee driving the wedge between working class Americans again yesterday, and now you have Clinton once again playing the fear card with her "slip" of mentioning Bobby Kennedy in relation to Obama (which was very disappointing when she did it back in March, but is absolutely tasteless when done right now given Ted Kennedy's condition).  Clinton's presidential campaign is now ending, but I can't understand why she is determined to further divide the Democratic party and further diminish the Clinton legacy?

  • comment on a post Clinton Steps Back over 5 years ago

    I have had so many "final straw" moments with the Clinton Campaign, it would be dishonest for me to say that this was one of them.  But I have long supported the concept that Clinton should stay in the campaign until the last primary vote on June 3rd and then close down her campaign being able to say "we fought to the end".  She has fought hard, and should be respected for that.  But my caveat to her staying in until June 3rd was that she would end the negative attacks on Obama and focus on Democratic party unity.  But sadly, the best interests of the Democratic party do not appear to be what the Clinton campaign is interested in at this point.  You had Ferraro driving a further wedge with female Democrats with her comments about sexism last week, and you had AFSCME's McEntee driving the wedge between working class Americans again yesterday, and now you have Clinton once again playing the fear card with her "slip" of mentioning Bobby Kennedy in relation to Obama (which was very disappointing when she did it back in March, but is absolutely tasteless when done right now given Ted Kennedy's condition).  Clinton's presidential campaign is now ending, but I can't understand why she is determined to further divide the Democratic party and further diminish the Clinton legacy?

  • comment on a post West Virginia from the ground over 5 years ago

    I really appreciate the on the ground view from WV, as well as your relatively balanced perspective on this race.  I am an Obama supporter, and have gone to Texas and Pennsylvania as a campaign volunteer, so I can relate when you mention out of state volunteers in your post.  I also picked up on your comment above: "I can only speak from my experience, but I've never heard any of the Obama campaign staffers, and there's several here, ever speak disparagingly of Senator Clinton's supporters or to bring up the racism card when it comes to West Virginia voters."  I will echo that as well from my experience--and I have encountered probably over 100 paid Obama for America staff--that they always speak respectfully of Senator Clinton and stay focused on the bigger picture (winning the White House) even in the face of very personal attacks from the Clinton campaign and their surrogates.  

    As this primary is winding down, your post also reinforces the long term net positive aspect of such a protracted fight: there are record numbers of Democrats registered and field organizing that can be leveraged in the general in all 50 states.  Some say that former Clinton campaign volunteers will not step up to support the Obama campaign in the fall, but my experience makes me disagree.  After the initial hurt of Clinton's loss, I believe that a majority of former Clinton volunteers will remember the bigger picture and focus on getting a Democrat back in the White House so we can all get to work on rebuilding this country.  When I was outside Pittsburgh canvassing for Obama, we encoutered Hillary canvassers who were working the same turf.  We stopped and chatted and were both respectful and candid with each other--even in the midst of a bitter fight--and I have no doubt that they will be working alongside the other local Democratic activists in the Fall for Obama and other local Democratic candidates.  I respect any American citizen who actually leaves their house to go volunteer in the political process--regardless of their personal choice of candidate--and believe that the majority of those who do so have a greater capacity to see the bigger picture (Those who sit at home and fire off hate filled blog posts and comments are another matter).

    By the time of the Democratic Convention, we will be a united party once again--and partly due to this exhausting and intense primary fight--we will be the most formidable political machine this nation has ever seen.

  • comment on a post The Tie Has Been Broken over 5 years ago

    I really appreciate your post, Todd.  Over the course of this primary season, the often extreme pro-Hillary slant of MyDD (and its commenters) was almost enough to keep me away.  I almost removed MyDD from my RSS feeds many times.  But every once in a while I would get something of value that kept me coming back, and this post proves that there is more substance and perspective (at least from Todd) to be had.  This line of yours especially resonated with me:

    "And let's be honest here, you and I know he is a far stronger candidate for having had Hillary Clinton as his opponent."

    I have volunteered for the Obama campaign in several states and put in countless hours this season, and I must agree with you there.  It was extremely difficult to take as an Obama supporter, and I will be honest that my view of the Clintons (or their campaign) has lessened in some ways due to some of the attacks.  But I will say without hesitation that Hillary is one hell of a fighter, and a damn worthy opponent.  And when all the dust settles, Obama and his campaign have had to toughen up, as I think all of us on all sides have had to.  There are a million ways that this whole thing could still end badly, but if Democrats unite soon, lick our wounds and heal our divisions, we will be an unstoppable machine going into November!

  • comment on a post Dueling Pennsylvania Ads over 6 years ago

    As usual, the media and Hillary Campaign underestimate the intelligence of most VOTERS (and I do want to stress the voters aspect as opposed to other Americans who do not vote).  I am in Pennsylvania right now and have done canvassing (door knocking) for the Obama Campaign for the last 5 days at hundreds of doors in working class neighborhoods (including some very poor neighborhoods) and NOT ONCE have I heard a single person mention this issue in a negative way, and the few people who have mentioned it have either (a) joked about how the Hillary Campaign thinks they are stupid, just like other politicians and media, or (b) acknowledged that they are bitter because of decades of economic decline and neglect and they are ready for a real change.  And the two Obama Campaign offices' staff and volunteers here have discussed the "bitter" issue a lot and I have not heard of anyone else canvassing or phonebanking on the thousands of houses and calls who made a big issue of it.  

    So, my guess is that the longer Hillary keeps milking this issue, the more of a NET LOSS this will be for her campaign.  Meanwhile, the Obama Campaign will keep doing what we do best, respecting voters' intelligence, talking with them one on one at their door and on the phone about the real issues that matter in America.

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