'Jim Crow Era' Voter Restrictions Continue to 'Dampen Voting Power'

Cross-posted at Project Vote's blog, Voting Matters

Weekly Voting Rights News Update

By Erin Ferns

Despite growing political interest among Americans, this November millions of people who "live, work and raise families in our communities" will be denied the right to elect our next president  as a result of a past felony conviction. Felon disenfranchisement has raised concerns among advocates and legislators that such laws further perpetuate disparities not only in the electorate, but also in society.

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Washington Post: Obama and Clinton Both Pad Resumes

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/con tent/article/2008/03/23/AR2008032301706. html?hpid=topnews

Tomorrow on the front page of the Washington Post, the Post will report on how both candidates embellish their roles.  Here is the lead:

After weeks of arduous negotiations, on April 6, 2006, a bipartisan group of senators burst out of the "President's Room," just off the Senate chamber, with a deal on new immigration policy.

As the half-dozen senators -- including John McCain (R-Ariz.) and Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) -- headed to announce their plan, they met Sen. Barack Obama (D-Ill.), who made a request common when Capitol Hill news conferences are in the offing: "Hey, guys, can I come along?" And when Obama went before the microphones, he was generous with his list of senators to congratulate -- a list that included himself.

"I want to cite Lindsey Graham, Sam Brownback, Mel Martinez, Ken Salazar, myself, Dick Durbin, Joe Lieberman . . . who've actually had to wake up early to try to hammer this stuff out," he said.

To Senate staff members, who had been arriving for 7 a.m. negotiating sessions for weeks, it was a galling moment. Those morning sessions had attracted just three to four senators a side, Sen. Arlen Specter (R-Pa.) recalled, each deeply involved in the issue. Obama was not one of them.

For those interested in reading about Obama's padded Illinois resume, read the following:  http://www.houstonpress.com/2008-02-28/n ews/barack-obama-screamed-at-me/full

It's a long piece, but well worth reading.

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Legalizing Voter Suppression: Proof Of Citizenship Bills Appear in State Legislatures

Cross-posted at Project Vote's blog, Voting Matters

Weekly Voting Rights News Update

By Erin Ferns

As multiple reports circulate, touting record breaking turnout this primary season, several state legislatures are introducing draconian bills that would block voters from even registering. Proof of citizenship requirements at registration are up for discussion in 11 states this legislative session. One from Kansas made provocative headlines this week, just days after another, Virginia's HB 68, quietly died on the House floor.

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Hype? Let's talk about "Hype"

Yes, this is a response diary.  But it will be long enough to stand on its own.  Every on Daily Kos is going crazy for a diary entitled I Refuse to By Into the Obama Hype.  It purports to compare Hillary's Senate record to Obama's and concludes Obama's is superior.  Why? Two reasons. First, in the diarist's opinion his bills are better.  Second his bills have more sponsors than hers, and that demonstrates "leadership."  Excuse me, but, well bullshit.  "Leadership" doesn't come from getting people to join you.  "Leadership" comes from getting people to FOLLOW you, to DO things.  As in, pass laws.  Can we look at what they both actually achieved?  

(Cross-posted from Daily Kos, so if you want it to have legs there give it a comment and a Recommend. Thanks.)

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Give me your tired, your poor and a $5,000 fine

Democratic and Republican senators reached a compromise on immigration Friday, but the result was a bill that satisfied no one.

The current bill offers legal status to 12 million immigrants already living in the United States - which some critics call "amnesty." Illegal workers already in the United States could receive a temporary Z visa, but to become U.S. citizens, they would have to pay steep fines, periodically return to their home countries, wait at least eight years - and pay their own health insurance.

United States' immigration policy has always been geared to uniting families, but this bill gives immigrants limited means of petitioning for relatives.

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