Oliver Stone's "Border" Shows Fall of South America's Berlin Wall

On April 13, 2002, an event occurred in Venezuela which was as world-historical for South America as the fall of the Berlin Wall was for Eastern Europe: a U.S.-backed coup against the democratically-elected government of Venezuela collapsed. The Bush Administration's efforts to promote the coup failed, in the face of popular resistance in Venezuela, and diplomatic resistance in the region.

The failure of the Bush Administration's effort to overthrow President Chavez was world-historical for South America because it sent a powerful new signal about the limits of the ability of the United States to thwart popular democracy in the region. In the years prior to the reversal of the U.S.-backed coup, popular movements in South America had suffered from a widespread "Allende syndrome": a key legacy of the U.S.-orchestrated overthrow of democracy in Chile in 1973 was the widespread belief that there was a sharp limit to the popular economic reforms that could be achieved through the ballot box, because the United States simply wouldn't allow formal democracy in the region to respond to the economic needs of the majority.

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Oliver Stone's "Border" Shows Fall of South America's Berlin Wall

On April 13, 2002, an event occurred in Venezuela which was as world-historical for South America as the fall of the Berlin Wall was for Eastern Europe: a U.S.-backed coup against the democratically-elected government of Venezuela collapsed. The Bush Administration's efforts to promote the coup failed, in the face of popular resistance in Venezuela, and diplomatic resistance in the region.

The failure of the Bush Administration's effort to overthrow President Chavez was world-historical for South America because it sent a powerful new signal about the limits of the ability of the United States to thwart popular democracy in the region. In the years prior to the reversal of the U.S.-backed coup, popular movements in South America had suffered from a widespread "Allende syndrome": a key legacy of the U.S.-orchestrated overthrow of democracy in Chile in 1973 was the widespread belief that there was a sharp limit to the popular economic reforms that could be achieved through the ballot box, because the United States simply wouldn't allow formal democracy in the region to respond to the economic needs of the majority.

There's more...

Oliver Stone's "Border" Shows Fall of South America's Berlin Wall

On April 13, 2002, an event occurred in Venezuela which was as world-historical for South America as the fall of the Berlin Wall was for Eastern Europe: a U.S.-backed coup against the democratically-elected government of Venezuela collapsed. The Bush Administration's efforts to promote the coup failed, in the face of popular resistance in Venezuela, and diplomatic resistance in the region.

The failure of the Bush Administration's effort to overthrow President Chavez was world-historical for South America because it sent a powerful new signal about the limits of the ability of the United States to thwart popular democracy in the region. In the years prior to the reversal of the U.S.-backed coup, popular movements in South America had suffered from a widespread "Allende syndrome": a key legacy of the U.S.-orchestrated overthrow of democracy in Chile in 1973 was the widespread belief that there was a sharp limit to the popular economic reforms that could be achieved through the ballot box, because the United States simply wouldn't allow formal democracy in the region to respond to the economic needs of the majority.

There's more...

Crisis in South America: Possible Venezuela-Colombia war

Here's a diary entry that isn't a candidate diary, for once.

Manynewsagencies from all over the world are reporting that Colombia and Venezuela may go to war. Colombia is one of the few US allies in South America (we've given it billions of dollars in foreign aid, and supplied a few hundred troops as advisers), and Venezuela has one of the largest oil supplies in the Western hemisphere.

The background of this crisis is that Colombia launched an air strike into Ecuador territory to kill Raul Reyes, a top commander of a group of Colombian rebels. Analogies to this action might be if we invaded Pakistan to root out Al-Qaeda and Taliban members, or if (not likely to happen) Cuba launches an air strike into the U.S. aimed at anti-Castro exile terrorists such as Luis Clemente Faustino Posada Carriles.

In any case, Ecuadorian president Rafael Correa is friendly to Hugo Chavez of Venezeula, who has responded to the airstrike by shutting down the Venezuelan embassy in Bogota (capital of Colombia) and ordered ten tank battalions moved to the border of Colombia.

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Economic Space and Big Picture National Security

In the 1930's, there was an idea in common currency of "Economic Space".  What collection of resources and markets were needed by the Big Powers to remain Big Powers -- and how secure were they in their Economic Space.

And in the 1930's, it became clearer and clearer that there were about three Economic Spaces that four Big Powers were trying to fit into -- The UK (as the previous number one economic power), the US (as the recently emerged number one economic power), Germany (as the resurgant Continental European power), and Japan (widely underestimated in its own right, but taken serious in terms of shorter supply lines to the eastern Pacific Basin).

Fitting four into three implied war, and war there was.

And that's what makes the Bush National Security agenda scary.  It seems like the Bush agenda is for the US to have the whole world, and everyone else can have the rest.  If there ever was a path to war, this is it.

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